A new Lactose Intolerance in Multicultural Communities Survey sponsored by the LACTAID® Brand found that 78 percent of African American women reduce the amount of milk or dairy in their diet as a way to manage their lactose intolerance. Yet, 48 percent of African American women who have lactose intolerance worry the condition keeps them from consuming important nutrients, such as calcium and vitamins A and D. Despite their concerns, only 16 percent have talked to a health care professional about lactose intolerance. The study found that half of African American women are unsure about what foods are safe to eat without triggering symptoms and 12 percent remove dairy from their diet completely as a way to control their lactose intolerance. This is concerning as dairy foods and beverages contain essential nutrients that are important for a healthy lifestyle. Since up to 80 percent of African Americans may have symptoms of lactose intolerance, there is a need for a greater understanding of how to manage the condition. In fact lactose intolerance is easy to diagnose and easy to manage, without forgoing milk and the dairy foods African Americans and their families love. That’s why to help educate women about lactose intolerance, the LACTAID® Brand has partnered with Delilah Winder, celebrity chef, author and restaurant owner, to share her recipes and tips for eating healthy and enjoying dairy again. The LACTAID(R) Brand recently conducted the Lactose Intolerance in Multicultural Communities Survey to gain insight into how multicultural women, who are more likely to have lactose intolerance, understand and manage the condition. Additional findings include:

  • Fifty-seven percent of African American women feel inconvenienced by their condition.
  • Eighty-four percent want to keep dairy in their diet because of its health benefits – 48 percent because it is a natural source of calcium and nutrients and 36 percent to maintain healthy bones.
  • A majority of African American women are worried about managing their lactose intolerance in social settings.
  • Seventy-four percent worry about experiencing symptoms when enjoying a meal with others.
  • Sixty-two percent feel they have to avoid certain foods before or during social events.
  • Forty-eight percent are uncertain about eating foods prepared by friends or family.
  • Sixty-three percent of African American women do not know that lactose-free products, like LACTAID(R) Milk, Ice Cream and Cottage Cheese, have the same important nutrients found in regular milk and other dairy products.
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